"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." - L.D

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
― Albert Einstein

Reblogged from s-cientia

Azuma Makoto sends flowers to space in his latest installation piece, Exobiotanica.

(Source: digg)

Reblogged from betype

betype:

Web Products by Valerio Loi

Four Stages of Competence

Reblogged from medicalstate

medicalstate:

In the 1970s, Noel Burch described four stages of learning any new skill and it could be summarized as follows:

  • Unconscious incompetence, where one does not recognize a deficit;
  • Conscious incompetence, where one does recognize a deficit and how to improve their skill;
  • Conscious competence,…

Reblogged from bbygl

bobbycaputo:

Mind-Blowing TV Spot Recreates Six Iconic Images in One Uninterrupted Shot

Reblogged from sagansense

sagansense:

My mug terraforms Mars when it gets too hot :D

…courtesy of my space family over at Explore Mars. The mug was one of Space X’s contributions to the Humans 2 Mars Summit I attended with my team for our film, I want to be an Astronaut.

colchrishadfield:

Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

Reblogged from colchrishadfield

colchrishadfield:

Weightlessness is like rapid aging. Of the 100s of experiments on ISS, we learn much from this: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/the-hazardous-effects-of-spaceflight/article19192504/

freshphotons:

"Of the 118 elements that make up everything—from the compounds in a chemists arsenal to consumer products on the shelf—44 will face supply limitations in the coming years. These critical elements include rare earth elements, precious metals, and even life essentials like Phosphorus. Research into more abundant alternatives, more efficient uses, recycling and recovery will help mitigate risks and move industry us towards sustainable supply chains." Via.

Reblogged from freshphotons

freshphotons:

"Of the 118 elements that make up everything—from the compounds in a chemists arsenal to consumer products on the shelf—44 will face supply limitations in the coming years. These critical elements include rare earth elements, precious metals, and even life essentials like Phosphorus. Research into more abundant alternatives, more efficient uses, recycling and recovery will help mitigate risks and move industry us towards sustainable supply chains." Via.

Reblogged from staff

staff:

Tune in at 4pm ET!

Reblogged from freshphotons

nevver:

When Science Fiction became Fact (larger)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

What does a nerve synapse, the point where a signal is passed to the next neuron, really look like? Your biology textbook probably had a picture like this:

The reality, reported by German scientists this week in the journal Science, is much, much more complex. They pieced together the blobby jumble through microscopy and advanced protein science, giving us the best picture yet of what a nerve synapse really looks like.  

We’ve already talked about how cells are not bags of water filled with a few organelles, and the synapse is no exception, as it has to shuttle packages of chemicals in and out of the cell sometimes dozens of times per second. The 100+ trillion synapses in your brain all depend on this seemingly chaotic (but really it’s highly regulated) architecture to function.

Looking at this, it’s a wonder that our nerves work at all. But they do, and despite what looks like chaos, they work quite well. I mean, think about it (there they go working again) … they’re what let us figure all this out in the first place.

via freshphotons:

A 3D model of synaptic architecture. ”We used an integrative approach, combining quantitative immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to determine protein numbers; electron microscopy to measure organelle numbers, sizes, and positions; and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to localize the proteins. Using these data, we generated a three-dimensional model of an “average” synapse, displaying 300,000 proteins in atomic detail.” Via.

Virginia Hughes has more coverage at National Geographic.