Ckreativity

Cup of science, spoonful of art, and a dash of whatever else the universe has to offer.

Antibiotics Resistance and the Race for New Bacteria

Reblogged from medicalstate

medicalstate:

I remember going to an infectious disease lecture some time ago and hearing the specialist paint a grim portrait of the future: the rapid resistance bacteria is developing against our weaponry will make antibiotics obsolete in the next fifty years. Unless we do something about it, we will be propelled back into the dark ages.

This article is a good snapshot of where we stand now in the search for novel therapies.

Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork

nubbsgalore:

Migaloo, one of only two known all white humpback whales, was photographed off the northern coast of new south wales as he made his annual migration north from Antarctica. Migaloo lost claim to being the only all white humpback in 2011, when an all white calf was spotted in these waters. most believe Migaloo, now 35, to be the father. Though often described as albino, Migaloo has brown eyes and is more likely leucistic or hypopigmented. 

photos by (click pic) jenny dean, jonas liebschner and ray alley

Patenting the Un-patentable: Biomimicry in Our Everyday Lives

Reblogged from scinote

scinote:

image

[image source]

One day in 1941, Swiss engineer Georges de Mestral (above) went for a walk in the woods.

It was just like any other day, but this time, he took a closer look at the burrs that clung so intently to his pant legs and his dog’s fur. Eight years and a great deal of…

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Reblogged from mediclopedia

mediclopedia:

Vertebral Implant

3-D printing has been gaining more and more traction in the medical field. It’s versatility and precision allows for some amazing work to be done. 

Here is an example of a vertebral implant done in China. The idea is simple, but the execution was elegantly done. They used titanium that is already used safely for the main component of the vertebrae, and used a porous material that allows for fusion with the natural cell growth in the body.

This brings up an interesting point about the development and implementation of new technology… In foreign countries we are seeing the rise of these 3-D printed implants being used in the clinics, but because of the strict restrictions in the U.S. most 3-D printing technology is still being used for imaging and modeling purposes. Of course this allows for increase in safety and ensures optimal integration of the technology, but creates too much barriers (incl financial, accessibility) for patients…

I know we have readers pitching in from all over the world, what are your thoughts on regulations at your country? Do you feel like more regulations are needed, or maybe less?

Reblogged from s-cientia

(Source: cindymayweather)

ucsdhealthsciences:

Ebola Up Close
At this point, there’s not much that hasn’t been said or written about the Ebola virus, though if you want a good history and general background, check out the World Health Organization’s fact sheet.
The image above, produced by Heinz Feldmann, Peter Jahrling, Elizabeth Fischer and Anita Mora of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, depicts the stringy virus emerging from an infected cell in search of new cells to infect.

Reblogged from ucsdhealthsciences

ucsdhealthsciences:

Ebola Up Close

At this point, there’s not much that hasn’t been said or written about the Ebola virus, though if you want a good history and general background, check out the World Health Organization’s fact sheet.

The image above, produced by Heinz Feldmann, Peter Jahrling, Elizabeth Fischer and Anita Mora of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, depicts the stringy virus emerging from an infected cell in search of new cells to infect.

scinote:

India’s Mars Satellite Arrives at Mars in One of the Cheapest Mars Missions Yet

Mangalyaan, which is Hindu for Mars craft, was launched in November of 2013. Last Wednesday (September 23, 2014), it entered Mars’ orbit and is one of the cheapest missions to Mars yet, costing only $74 million, even less than the $100 million budget to make the movie Gravity.
One factor contributing to the low price is the fact that they launched the spacecraft into Earth orbit and then boosted it from there to Mars once it had enough speed, eliminating the need to build a brand new heavy lift rocket. Another reason is that staff members for India’s space agency are paid lower salaries compared to that of other space agencies around the world.
This also marks the first time a country has succeeded on its first attempt at getting a spacecraft to Mars. Mangalyaan will now start researching methane deposits on the surface and how they are produced. There are only two ways in which methane is produced naturally here on Earth: through seismic activity and through life processes.
As one of the lowest cost missions to Mars to date, this is an important milestone in the history of space exploration. One of the biggest hurdles to space exploration right now is its huge price tag, so missions like this will inspire others to follow in Mangalyaan’s steps. It’s also a huge boon to India’s domestic space program; the fact that it can be done with less money than a Hollywood blockbuster shows just how much potential there is for the future. Combined with NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft, which arrived at around the same time, and other spacecrafts currently operating on and around Mars, Mangalyaan will provide more knowledge and insight about natural conditions on Mars.

Submitted by Aram H., Discoverer.
Edited by Jessica F.

Reblogged from scinote

scinote:

India’s Mars Satellite Arrives at Mars in One of the Cheapest Mars Missions Yet

Mangalyaan, which is Hindu for Mars craft, was launched in November of 2013. Last Wednesday (September 23, 2014), it entered Mars’ orbit and is one of the cheapest missions to Mars yet, costing only $74 million, even less than the $100 million budget to make the movie Gravity.

One factor contributing to the low price is the fact that they launched the spacecraft into Earth orbit and then boosted it from there to Mars once it had enough speed, eliminating the need to build a brand new heavy lift rocket. Another reason is that staff members for India’s space agency are paid lower salaries compared to that of other space agencies around the world.

This also marks the first time a country has succeeded on its first attempt at getting a spacecraft to Mars. Mangalyaan will now start researching methane deposits on the surface and how they are produced. There are only two ways in which methane is produced naturally here on Earth: through seismic activity and through life processes.

As one of the lowest cost missions to Mars to date, this is an important milestone in the history of space exploration. One of the biggest hurdles to space exploration right now is its huge price tag, so missions like this will inspire others to follow in Mangalyaan’s steps. It’s also a huge boon to India’s domestic space program; the fact that it can be done with less money than a Hollywood blockbuster shows just how much potential there is for the future. Combined with NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft, which arrived at around the same time, and other spacecrafts currently operating on and around Mars, Mangalyaan will provide more knowledge and insight about natural conditions on Mars.

Submitted by Aram H., Discoverer.

Edited by Jessica F.

Reblogged from spaceplasma

spaceplasma:

Total Lunar Eclipse

A total lunar eclipse will take place on October 8, 2014. It is the latter of two total lunar eclipses in 2014, and the second in a tetrad (four total lunar eclipses in series).

Lunar eclipses occur when the Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, however, for a total lunar eclipse to occur, the Moon and Earth have to be on the same orbital plane with the Sun — this is known as a syzygy. During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon travels completely into the Earth’s shadow (umbra). Even though the Moon is immersed in the Earth’s shadow, indirect sunlight will still reach the Moon. As sunlight passes through Earth’s atmosphere it gets absorbed and then radiated out (scattered). The atmosphere filters out most of the blue-colored light. What’s left over is the orange- and red-colored light. From the Moon’s perspective the Earth’s edge appears to glow bright orange or red. This red-colored light passes through our atmosphere without getting scattered, projecting indirect, reddish light onto the Moon.

For more information:

Credit: NASA/SVS

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The mystery of the roaming rocks of Death Valley’s Racetrack Playa may be at an end. Since their discovery in the 1940s, researchers have speculated about what conditions on the playa could cause 15+ kg rocks to slide tens or hundreds of meters across the dry lakebed. But the rare nature of the movement and the remoteness of the location had prevented direct observation of the phenomenon until last December when a research team caught the rocks in motion (see the timelapse animation above or the source video). Winter rain and snow had created a shallow ice-encrusted pond across the playa by the time the researchers arrived to check their previously installed equipment. Late one sunny morning, the melting ice, only millimeters thick, cracked into plates tens of meters wide and began to move under the light breeze (~4-5 m/s). Despite its windowpane-like thickness, the ice pushed GPS-instrumented rocks up to hundreds of meters at speeds of 2-5 m/min. It took just the right mix of conditions—sun, wind, snow, and water—but the two ice-shoving instances the team observed go a long way toward explaining the sailing rocks. (Image credits: R. Norris et al.; J. Norris, source video; NASA Goddard; via Discover and SciAm)

I always thought of these rocks as Earth’s real-life version of Doctor Who's Weeping Angels. We knew they moved, it just never happened while we were looking (although the rocks of Racetrack Playa, to the best of my knowledge, are not and were never trying to kill us). 

Mystery solved!