Ckreativity

Cup of science, spoonful of art, and a dash of whatever else the universe has to offer.

Reblogged from quantumaniac

quantumaniac:

Best View Yet of Merging Galaxies in Distant Universe
Check out this awesome article from Astronomy.com:
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), among other telescopes, has obtained the best view yet of a collision between two galaxies when the universe was only half its current age.
Check out the article to learn more about how what one scientist called “natural lenses created by the universe” helped to see this.
Unfortunately, a galactic collision is projected to happen between the Milky Way and Andromeda - but don’t worry, not for another 4 billion years. Check out a simulation video here

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Why Are Stars Star-Shaped?

Great new video from MinutePhysics that asks why we draw stars as star-shapes, when they’re really just spherical orbs of superheated plasma (and those are much easier to draw, by the way).

We know that stars twinkle because of the distortion caused by our atmosphere miles above your head, but that’s not what gives them their apparent star shape. If that were the case, then why do Hubble images also flare out? Unless J.J. Abrams works for NASA or something…

The actual answer lies in your very own eye. I won’t spoil the rest, but after my video this week (which looked into why goats have such weirdly shaped rectangular pupils), I have to know: What does the ungulate astronomer see?

PS - Which came first, stars… or stars?

Reblogged from refreshedforlife

refreshedforlife:

Google Android Wear

Imagine Google Now on your wrist - well now its here.

We knew that Google was cooking up a version of Android designed specifically for wearables, and today the company followed through. Android Wear is a Google Now-centric platform for smartwatches – and, eventually, other wearables as well.

Android Wear delivers what many folks have been waiting for before investing in a smartwatch. It’s contextual Google Now information combined with almost-instant Google voice commands. (via Gizmag)

See the preview development video - here

Reblogged from freshphotons

freshphotons:

Hood By Air chromosomes long sleeve shirt, Hood By Air temperature pixels long sleeve shirt.

commovente:

Hangzhou, China: A piece of graphene aerogel developed at Zhejiang University is placed on a cherry flower. The sponge-like matter weighs 0.16 milligrams per cubic centimetre and is the world’s lightest solid material.

Reblogged from s-cientia

commovente:

Hangzhou, China: A piece of graphene aerogel developed at Zhejiang University is placed on a cherry flower. The sponge-like matter weighs 0.16 milligrams per cubic centimetre and is the world’s lightest solid material.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

Reblogged from quantumaniac

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.
That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.
SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.
We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:
the most interesting science news you have come across
questions you’ve always wanted to ask
fascinating facts that you’ve learned
pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
cool research that you’ve participated in
any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:
Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
Read more about our project here.
If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!
Thank you all and happy science!

Reblogged from scinote

scinote:

Coming soon: SciNote.org, launched by entrop-e, shychemist, and geogallery, is Tumblr’s project for promoting science education around the world.

At SciNote, we believe that science shouldn’t just be reading about the ideas of people with PhDs and Nobel Prizes. We believe that science is an active process of asking questions and finding answers.

That’s why we, at SciNote, want to hear from you. We want to ponder the interesting questions you pose and get excited with you over the cool science you see in your world.

SciNote will feature the best of the Tumblr science community, and we will compile and publish the top posts from every year in the form of a magazine available both digitally and in print. Think of SciNote magazine as the Tumblr science magazine.

We hope to celebrate our launch by featuring some of the coolest science from around Tumblr. So before we launch SciNote, we would like to collect 25 science posts and/or questions from you, including:

  • the most interesting science news you have come across
  • questions you’ve always wanted to ask
  • fascinating facts that you’ve learned
  • pictures of nature and/or science that you’ve taken
  • cool research that you’ve participated in
  • any other science-related thing you’d like to tell us!

So please:

  1. Submit posts or ask questions to be featured on our blog and for an opportunity to be published in SciNote magazine.
  2. Follow our blog at SciNote.org.
  3. Read more about our project here.
  4. If you’re interested, apply to join our staff here.
  5. Reblog this post so that we can collect 25 posts and launch our project as soon as possible!

Thank you all and happy science!

Reblogged from bbygl

(Source: ladyinterior)

Reblogged from refreshedforlife

refreshedforlife:

Science is “a practice, an artform still budding in its years.” 

Another great response to my “All Call Challenge” in partnership with Call Me Ishmael, where book-lovers everywhere are calling in to share stories of a book that changed their view of the natural world. This one features Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, which I must agree is at or near the top of my you-must-definitely-read-this list for any curious reader or fan of science. It’s a classic, weaving science and storytelling, that will make you ask just as many questions as it answers.

You have no idea how happy it makes me to see these responses coming in (check out some others here and here), these inspiring and profound stories being shared with the world by curious people, all because of a little chat I had with a typewriter named Ishmael. 

Stay curious! (jtotheizzoe)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.